Garden ROI

August 18, 2009 at 1:23 am Leave a comment

James Ware, a gardener at Hands and Heart Farm in Brooklyn, was stunned when he earned more than $2,000 selling his garden-grown crops at the local farmers market the first year the garden opened in 2007.

James Ware, a gardener at Hands and Heart Farm in Brooklyn, was stunned when he earned more than $2,000 selling his garden-grown crops at the local farmers market the first year the garden opened in 2007.

Check out this op-ed piece by George Ball, chairman of the W. Atlee Burpee & Co., the largest supplier of seeds to home gardeners in the United States.

Not surprisingly, Mr. Ball extols seeds — “God’s microchips,” he calls them — and the virtues of home gardening.  Mr. Ball argues that home gardening provides people with much more than a sense of connection. In today’s shaky economic times, gardening is an excellent investment.  A hundred dollars in seeds produces a harvest that would cost consumers $2,500 at the supermarket, a 25-to-1 return, he writes. 

With other gardening costs factored in, I doubt the return would be quite that high.  Still, no one can argue the bounty — and pleasure — that comes from a simple seed.  Take urban farmer James Ware whom I interviewed last year (pictured above). He made more than $2,000 selling crops from two rows he planted at Hands and Heart Farm, a community garden in East New York, Brooklyn.

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Entry filed under: City Farmers, Community Gardens, Local Food Production. Tags: , , , , , , , , .

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